Part-part-whole/ Place Value PartioningWHOLE NUMBERS

Now and Next

Where are they now?

Recognises numbers to 5 in terms of their parts eg 5 is 4 and 1, or 3 and 2

Where to next?

Recognises numbers to 10 in terms of their parts eg 8 is 6 and 2, 1 more than 7, 2 less than 10 ..)

Purpose

When students become familiar with ways in which different numbers add together, particularly if this knowledge is associated with mental images of objects, they are more able to perform rapid mental calculations.

Resources

Activities where students are encouraged to use physical models to make a total, help students to develop skills around this idea.

 

Linked activitiesLinked Activities

  • download Part-part whole board
  • download Tens frames (video example)
  • download Target
  • download Memory-to-ten (video example)
  • download Playing card flash

AssessmentAssessment

  • download What does my number look like?

other resources References to Other Resources

 

 

Activities and Assessments

 

download Part-part whole board

Part-part whole board

Focus: Identifying pairs of numbers that add to make a given, single digit number.

How: Place a known number of counters in the box on the board and then split them into two different groups. Count and discuss the two groups that make up the initial number and record by drawing a diagram or picture of the two groups. Repeat.

Download part-part-whole board


download Tens frames (video example)

Tens frames (video example) 

Adapted from 'Ten Frames', Developing Efficient Numeracy Strategies Stage 1 page 29. NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate 2003

Focus: Visualise numbers up to 10 as dot patterns. Become familiar with pairs of numbers that combine to make ten.

How: Provide each student with a ten-frame and 10 counters. Students take turns to roll a die displaying dot patterns, count the dots and place the corresponding number of counters onto the ten-frame. The exact number needed to complete the ten-frame must be rolled to finish.

Try adding a rule where students fill one row of the ten-frame first. This helps to emphasise the structure of the “five” part of the number and also to see a larger number as being “five and something”, eg seven could be seen as five and two.

Download Ten Frame Notes

Download Ten Frame Board

Download Spinner

Video example:

video English

video Djambarrpuyŋu

video Kriol


download Target

Target

Focus: Identifying pairs of numbers that add to make ten.  Having counters or unifix cubes available for children to use may help to build initial understanding.

How: Draw a large 3 x 3 grid on the floor.  Write a number from 1-9 in each square.
Put children into two teams.
First child throws one bean-bag onto grid.  Talk about what other number is needed to make ten.  Encourage the child to work it out.  The teacher can have counters to help with this. Child attempts to throw the second bean-bag onto that number. Score a point if successful. If unsuccessful, score a bonus point by calculating the total actually thrown. Score points using tally marks.

 

download Memory-to-ten game (video example)

Memory-to-ten game (video example)

Focus: Identifying pairs of numbers that add to make ten.  Having counters or unifix cubes available for children to use may help to build initial understanding.

How: Use playing cards 1-9.  Place in a 3 x 4 grid pattern face down.  Children take turns, turning two cards over.  Do they make ten? If they do, child keeps the card and the next child takes their turn.

Variation:Use ten-frame cards initially, to help build the part-part-whole idea with visual cues before going on to numeral cards.

Download Memory-to-ten game notes

Download Number Cards

Ten-Frame dot cards

Video example:

video English

video Djambarrpuyŋu

video Kriol

 

download Playing card flash

Playing card flash

Focus: Automatic recall of pairs of numbers that add to ten.

How: The teacher has a number of playing cards from 1-9.  Hold up one card, children respond as quickly as possible with the number needed to make ten.  The children can have ten unifix in front of them as a scaffold.  As they become familiar with the activity, take the unifix away and increase the speed of showing the cards.

Download Number Cards

 

download Assessment - What my number looks like

Assessment - What my number looks like

An appropriate number (for the stage of the student) is written in the centre of the sheet – the student then must try to make the number in a number of different ways (as indicated on the sheet.)

Download ‘What my number looks like’ sheet

Download ‘What my number looks like’ Assessment Rubric

 

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